Tag Archives: Omar Bogle

Feeling hopeful

It’s February and I can stop worrying about losing Che Adams; the transfer window has closed and we still have him.  This is the month for worrying about the EFL sanctions but I’m hoping that Daniel was correct in thinking that “if Blues are deducted points, I don’t think it will be an absolute disaster” and that “Blues have enough points on the board to be safe from” relegation.

So I’m feeling fairly hopeful at present.  Kerim Mrabti’s squad number is 18, which reminds me of Keith Fahey, whom I liked.  It’s totally irrational to feel that Mrabti might be a good player because I like his squad number but there’s a lot about supporting a team that’s irrational.  

I have updated my cheat sheet from last August by adding Kerim Mrabti and removing 4 names.  Steve Seddon spent the first half of this season on loan to League Two club Stevenage and is now on loan to AFC Wimbledon of League One. Three players left during the winter transfer window. Dan Scarr signed a two-and-a-half year deal with Walsall. Omar Bogle was on loan to Birmingham from Cardiff City but that loan was cancelled and he is now on loan to Portsmouth. Viv Solomon-Otabor has also gone to Portsmouth; he has gone there on loan until the end of the season.

As always, I’m looking forward to today’s game with a mixture of fear and hope.  Today the hope is a little bit stronger than the fear.

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Transfer window

I’ve never liked transfer windows.  I’m usually irritated by the silly rumours about who Birmingham City might bring in. This window I’m worried about who might leave. I feel bad that Omar Bogle’s loan has been cut short; he scored a great goal against Stoke and I would have liked to see a few more like that.  I will feel a lot worse if we lose one of our first team regulars. If someone like Che Adams is sold, it will feel as though the team is being ripped apart.

Birmingham City are playing Swansea this evening. It’s a place that has a lot of memories for Garry Monk and Pep Clotet, who has talked about his time there in an interview.  He said:

“We are better coaches now because of the difficulties we have faced,” says Clotet. “Garry has given me a lot of insight about British football and that has helped when dealing with players. I guess I have made him a bit more Spanish too. We have made each other better.”

I’ll be feeling a lot of respect for the players and fans, outside on a cold winter evening while I’m at home, keeping warm.  I hope they play well and get a point or three. I think it will be good to follow a game and think about that rather than the window. And it will fill some of the time until the window closes at 11 pm on Thursday.  We will know then which players we have and, even if it’s bad news, we can get on with the rest of the season.

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Enemies and friends

In Omar Bogle’s interview on BluesTV, he talked about scoring a goal against Jack Butland, a former Academy team mate of his. He said he talked with Jack after the game, but he didn’t talk about his goal. It sounded as though he had the ability that professional football players need to have, to regard opposing players as enemies during a game and as friends at other times.

I believe that fans also need to be able to do this. During games we want to see our team play well and be lucky; we want the opposition to play terribly and have the worst bad luck imaginable. But, at other times, we can sympathise with fans of other teams. When Frank Knight, a Blackpool fan, agreed to pay £20,000 to the Oyston family, owners of Blackpool, so that they wouldn’t take him to court for his rant against them on Facebook, fans from many other clubs made contributions to pay that, an example of the football community at its generous best.

I’m reading a book that discusses this: What we think about when we think about Football, by Simon Critchley, a Professor of Philosophy who supports Liverpool.  He says that “there is an inherent rationality in football that permits both passionately held commitment to one’s team at the same time as being able to tolerate, understand and indeed encourage others’ deeply felt support for their teams.”  It is not easy reading, but it is interesting and has some great photos.

Critchley wrote that “a game can be a 90-minute anxiety dream”.  Wednesday’s game felt like 87 anxious minutes until Bogle scored his brilliant goal and I stopped worrying that Stoke might equalise. But I will remember it as a brilliant game, with two great goals, a large crowd and an atmosphere that reminded me of how it felt when I stood with my dad on the Railway end about 65 years ago.

Hope I’ll also have good memories of today’s game.

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