Tag Archives: Faith

Strange but still good Friday

This has felt like a very strange Good Friday. On previous Good Fridays I have joined in with the prayer walk round Harborne and gone to the service on the High Street.  This year I just walked on my own around the retirement apartment block where I live.  We’ve been asked to stay within the building or gardens and I’m staying home as instructed and keeping 2 metres away from people I see. 

What seems like ages ago, I had planned to do the prayer walk and then go to the game against Swansea. But today, neither will take place.  Back in 2015 I wrote a post about going to a football game on a Good Friday and how I’d decided to go and remember the significance of the day in the quiet, reverence of the morning service and in the less reverent crowd in the afternoon, a crowd that probably had some similarities to those that watched and mocked as Jesus died. Watching the game and mocking the opposition is what football crowds do.

For me this day has still been good because of the significance it has for me. Whatever you believe and do this Easter, I hope you are safe and well.

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Faith and football on Easter Sunday

A protest is planned outside the Aston Villa ground today but it won’t be their fans protesting about their precarious position in the table. It is Aston Parish Church that is protesting against the timing of the match. The 1.30 pm kickoff means that members of churches in Aston will have to battle through crowds of supporters to celebrate the most important date in the Christian calendar.

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Good Friday

I feel I should write something for Easter but writing about things that are really important to me is so difficult and takes too long.  So I’m going to cheat and just copy and paste a sermon that my late husband preached on Good Friday ten years ago.  He was American so please forgive the American spelling and calling the M6 a freeway.

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“The Gift of Pain” by Dr Paul Brand and Philip Yancey

This book is about pain and its value.  It is written as a memoir of Dr Paul Brand, whose professional life revolved around the theme of pain.  As a child in India he observed pain and suffering as he watched his missionary parents treating those who came for help.  His parents were not doctors but had a little medical training that enabled them to treat ailments and, when necessary, extract teeth.  Some of the treatments Paul Brand watched were messy and revolting and made him decide that the last thing he wanted to do was to become a doctor.

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