Inequality

We live in a crazy world.  Lionel Messi, the highest paid footballer last season, received $111,000,000. Does he deserve that much? More and more people in this country are relying on food banks. If you think that they deserve that, try watching I, Daniel Blake on BBC iPlayer and see if you change your mind.

Yesterday evening, I went to a performance of Commonism, at the Rep.  It’s a conversation between two men, one British and one Norwegian, talking about the world today and imagining how the future could be better. At the end, they hand out copies of their manifesto. This suggests a maximum limit on the economic resources any one individual can possess and a universal basic income. I imagine that it would be a lot easier to get poor people to accept a basic income than to get rich people to limit what they own. The performance was thought provoking and I had much to think about as I walked back to my bus stop, past all the rough sleepers.

When I got back home, I saw the news about the latest Brexit squabble in Parliament. It seemed a far cry from the conversation I’d just listened to, about learning to disagree well. There was also news of Burton’s heavy defeat at Manchester City and the nightmare journey to get to Manchester experienced by some of their fans. The result was not that surprising when you consider the value of their squads. Sky reported that,

“Burton Albion’s squad value this season is around the £6m mark   … Manchester City’s current squad is valued at just over £1bn, with their most expensive acquisition, Riyad Mahrez, joining the club last summer for £60m.”

In other words, one of Manchester City’s players cost 10 times more than Burton’s squad. That enormous inequality just doesn’t seem right to me, with most of the TV money flooding into the Premier League. I can understand why owners of clubs lower down the pyramid pay out too much in the hope of getting promotion.  Birmingham City paid out too much; we are still waiting to find out what price we’ll have to pay for that. We are not the only club with financial problems. The situation feels more serious than just a few clubs breaking some rules; it feels as though the whole system is broken.

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4 thoughts on “Inequality

  1. Eric Jones

    Good thoughts thanks – I believe that we should have a requirement that teams play at least 5 British players in the Premiership and 8 players in the Championship. Would love to only have British owners but oh well!!!!

    Reply
  2. Ijaz

    Footballers are on another planet compared to the rest of us. Messi isn’t worth the money being paid but if someone is paying it he’d be a fool to turn it down.

    Reply
  3. rob cammerer

    its an absolute disgrace footballer know they are worth no where near the money they are paid , all these young people who are living on the streets , in some countries the children are taken and abused and killed , I bet you these players who earn stupid amounts of money dont bat an eyelid when they see all the shit people go through when they in million pound house just makes me sick,kro sotv

    Reply
  4. Bazzathebluenose

    I agree with you about the gross inequality and I watched I Daniel Blake last night and see exactly what you are saying. However, unfortunately life isn’t fair and if any of us is waiting for it to become so, we are going to wait a hell of a long time!

    Reply

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